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July 28, 2014
We Will Never Forget

   Worcester 6     

December 3, 1999

     FDNY 343 

      September 11, 2001

Past Apparatus / Company History

C2
May 14, 2009

 

1999 Chevy Tahoe

Photo Courtesy of Matt McDonald


C3
May 14, 2009

19?? Ford Crown Victoria

Photo Courtesy of Matt McDonald


C9
May 14, 2009

In Honor of the late Inspector Fowler 

1989 Ford Southern Econoline 350

Photo Courtesy of Matt McDonald


Chemical Company # 1
Apr 13, 2009

Chemical Company #1 - circa 1880, shown in front of quarters - 5 Western Avenue

Chemical Company #1 - circa 1880, shown in front of quarters - 5 Western Avenue Note the company dog standing next to the driver.   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey


Chemical Company #2
Apr 13, 2009

Chemical Company #2 - 1894 Babcock chemical apparatus - reorgaanized as Engine Company #9

Chemical Company #2 - 1894 Babcock chemical apparatus - reorganized as Engine Company #9   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 

In the year 1861, a privately owned company was organized by the Boston and Maine Railroad and was located in the Prison Point Yards. This company was designated as Washington #9 and was available to the city upon request. Washington #9 was disbanded in 1866.

On June 7, 1894, Chemical Company #2 was organized in new quarters at 167 Lexington Avenue using a Babcock Chemical Engine with 2 - 60 gallon chemical tanks. In 1916, the company was assigned a new Knox combination Hose and Chemical wagon. The company now was designated as Combination #2.

On October 2, 1928, the company was assigned a new American LaFrance 1000 gpm, triple combination pump. The company was now designated as Engine Company #9.

In 1951, a 1948 Pirsch 1000 gpm pump (formerly Engine 2's) was assigned to the company. On Feb. 1, 1952, a new GMC/Robinson hose wagon was placed in service by Engine 9, making the company double unit. This also made all engine companies in the city two-piece companies.

The pump was involved in an accident on Sept. 24, 1955. Auxiliary pump Engine 11 was now in use by Engine 9. On May 15, 1956, a 1944 Pirsch 750 gpm (former Engine 6) was placed in service as the pump. On July 14, 1967 a new International/Farrar hose wagon was assigned to the company, replacing the 1952 GMC.

A new Maxim, 1250 gpm/300 gallon water tank pump was placed in service on Nov. 3, 1971. Following a succession of spare hose wagons in use by the company, Engine 9 became single unit again in September, 1984.

On May 16, 1986, Engine 9 and Engine 5 swapped pumps. Engine 9 now ran with the 1979 Hendrickson/Continental 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank pump.

On August 11, 1989, a new 1989 Pierce Lance 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank apparatus was placed in service. This pump was in service until  the spring of 2004, when it was traded in on the newly ordered pump. Engine 9 ran with spare pump Engine 10 (the former Engine 6 pump) until the new pump was delivered and placed in service. 

On August 20, 2004, the current 2004 Pierce Saber 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank apparatus was paced in service.

- historical information for this narrative was provided by Ed Morrissey


Division 1
Apr 24, 2009

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 In 1912, the title, Deputy Fire Chief, came into use in the Cambridge Fire Department. Prior to this time, the titles, Assistant Chief and District Chief were used. In 1914, the Deputy Fire Chief was quartered with Engine 5 and Fire Headquarters in the new fire house in Inman Square, 1384 Cambridge Street. From 1914 until 1934, the Deputy Fire Chief was located at the Inman Square firehouse. On 25 February 1934, the Deputy Fire Chief was relocated to new quarters at the new Fire Headquarters at 491 Broadway.

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

On 12 June 1956, the city was divided into 2 fire suppression divisions. The downtown division was called Division 1. The Division 1 quarters remained at 491 Broadway until 1973. In 1973, the Division 1 Deputy Chief was relocated to Engine 2 quarters at 378 Massachusetts Av., Lafayette Square. In April of 1981, Division 1 relocated to its present location, the Inman Square firehouse.


Engine 1
Apr 13, 2009

 

Engine 1- circa 1875 (in front of quarters at Mount Auburn and Eliot Streets) - Amoskeag 400 gpm steamer and hose wagon built by Jones Company, carying 1000’ of hose 

photo by Tara Bithia 

Engine 1 Wagon- circa 1875

 photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 1 Pump- circa 1875

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 1 Wagon- 1948 GMC/Robinson Hose Wagon

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 1 Pump- 1960 Pirsch 1000 gpm

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 1 Pump- 1971 Maxim 1250 gpm

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey


 

Tower Wagon 1- 1977 American LaFrance 500 gallon booster tank/1250 gpm with 55' boom

Engine 1- 1979 Hendrickson/Continental 500 gallon booster tank/1250 gpm

 

Engine 1, called, "Cambridge 1," was organized in 1832 and was located in a building on Church Street, near Harvard Square. In 1854, the company moved to new quarters adjacent to the police district station on Church Street.

          On 20 June 1859, a new Hunneman hand Engine was placed in service by the company. During 1864, the house was remodeled and on 18 September of that year a new Amoskeag 400 gpm steamer and a Hunneman 2-wheel hose carriage with 900’ of hose were placed in service with Engine 1. On 10 Jan 1872, a new 4-wheel hose wagon built by Jones Company was placed in service carrying 1000’ of hose.

          In 1875, Engine Company #1 moved to new quarters in the city building at the corner of Mount Auburn and Eliot Street (where the Harvard House Hotel is now located). On 15 March 1883, a new steamer built by Manchester Locomotive works was placed in service. During 1885, Engine 1’s quarters was renovated. The living quarters was moved to the second floor and the city’s first sliding pole was installed.

          In 1890, a new Abbot and Downing hose wagon was placed in service. In November of 1921, Engine 1 was motorized when the company placed a new American LaFrance 750 gpm pump and a new American LaFrance hose wagon in service. Engine 1 was the last horse-drawn engine company in the city. (Ladder 2 was the last horse-drawn company).

          In 1928, Engine 1’s quarters was condemned and Engine 1 relocated to the quarters of Engine 6 at 176 River Street. On 25 February 1934, Engine 1 moved to new quarters at 491 Broadway. The 491 Broadway fire house is the current home of Engine 1.

          In January of 1940, a new Pirsch 1000 gpm pump was placed in service. In July, 1948, a new GMC/Robinson hose wagon was placed in service. In 1960, the 1947 fog wagon, previously in service with Rescue 1, was placed in service with Engine 1. Engine 1 became a 3-piece company and remained so for a few years. Also in November of 1960, the company placed a new 1000 gpm Pirsch pump in service.

          On 23 December 1962, Engine 1 placed in service as the pump, the 1948 Pirsch 1000 gpm formerly assigned to Engine 6. In July of 1966, a new International/Farrar hose wagon was assigned to the company. On 14 October 1971, a new Maxim, 1250 gpm pump with 300 gallons of water was placed in service as the pump. On 3 July 1977, a new 1000 gpm American LaFrance pump with 55’ Squrt articulating boom was placed in service as the wagon. This piece was lettered as "Tower Wagon 1."

          Engine 1 became single-unit on 6 May 1980. The Maxim pump was reassigned to Engine 8. On May of 1984, the American LaFrance Tower Wagon was placed out of service for refurbishing. It returned to service on 31 October 1984. The company ran with a spare pump during this time period. On 9 July 1991, a 1979 Continental 1250 gpm (former Engine 5/Engine 9) was assigned to the company. The American LaFrance Squrt Tower Wagon was placed out of service.

          Engine 1 placed a new Pierce Saber, 1250 gpm pump, with 500 gallon water tank, in service on 24 December 1996. The rebuilt Squrt boom from the former Tower Wagon is mounted on this new pump.

historical information provided by Ed Morrissey


Engine 2
Apr 13, 2009

Engine 2's pump and wagon in front of quarters, circa 1894. The steam pump was an 1873 Amoskeag 700 gpm. The hose wagon was an 1892 Abbot and Sowning.

Engine 2- pump and wagon in front of quarters, circa 1894. Steam pump-1873 Amoskeag 700 gpm / Hose wagon-1892 Abbot and Sowning 

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey  

Engine 2's 1951 Pirsch 1000 gpm pump

Engine 2-1951 Pirsch 1000 gpm pump   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 2's 1966 International/Farrar hose wagon

Engine 2-1966 International/Farrar hose wagon- 175 gallon booster tank/250gpm

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

1976 Pirsch 500 gallon booster tank/1250 gpm

Engine 2 Hose Wagon- 1982 International/Maxim 500 gallon booster tank/250 gpm

Engine 2's 1989 Pierce Lance pump - 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank

Engine 2's 1989 Pierce Lance pump - 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 

Engine Company #2 was established in 1846 and was located in a wood fire house on Main Street. The company at this time was named Union Engine Company #2. In 1851, this fire house was destroyed by fire.

In 1852, Engine 2 occupied a new brick fire house at 789 Main Street, near the corner of Windsor. Union Engine Company 2 shared these quarters with Franklin Hook and Ladder Company #1.(This fire house is still standing and is the current home of the Christian Holiness Mission Church.) The company's apparatus was a Howard and Davis hand engine.

During 1863, the house was remodeled and horse stalls were installed. On 1 August 1863, Engine 2 placed into service an Amoskeag, horse-drawn, second size 400 gpm steamer. In 1872, the company received a new 4-wheel , horse-drawn, hose carriage which had been built by Jones Company. The hose carriage carried 1000 feet of hose. On 28 November 1873, a new Amoskeag 700 gpm steamer was placed in service and in 1892, an Abbot and Downing hose wagon was placed in service.

On 6 February 1894, Engine 2 moved into new quarters on Front Street opposite Main Street. (Front Street was later renamed Massachusetts Avenue.) Over a hundred years later, this is the current quarters of Engine 2 at 378 Massachusetts Avenue. In 1907, Engine 2 and Engine 6 swapped pumps. Engine 2 now was assigned an1891, Amoskeag 900 gpm steam pump.

In 1919, the company was motorized. The 1891 Amoskeag steamer was equipped with a type 31, American LaFrance tractor. A new American LaFrance type 40 hose wagon was placed in service as the wagon. A new American LaFrance 750 gpm pump was assigned to the company in 1926. In June of 1948, a new Pirsch 1000 gpm pump was placed in service by Engine 2 and in July of 1948, a new GMC/Robinson hose wagon was placed in service. In July of 1951, a new Pirsch 1000 gpm pump was placed in service and in July of 1966, a new International/Farrar hose wagon was placed in service.

Engine 2 placed a new Pirsch 1250 gpm pump in service on 26 July 1978. The company placed in service a new International/Maxim hose wagon on 23 July 1982. On 1 April 1984, Engine 2 became a single unit company as the wagon was reassigned to Engine 4. On 16 May 1986, a new International/Saulsbury hose wagon was assigned to Engine 2. On 12 May 1988, this wagon was reassigned to Engine 4. Engine 2 again became a single-unit company. On the 12th of August 1989, a new Pierce Lance 1250 gpm (with 500 gallon water tank) was placed in service by Engine 2. The 1978 pump was reassigned to Engine 8.

Currently, the company runs a 2002 Pierce Saber 1250 gpm pump with a 500 gallon water tank. The 1989 Pierce was designated as Engine 11 and is now a spare pump. 

historical information provided by Ed Morrissey

 


Engine 3
Apr 13, 2009

Engine 3 circa 1896 - in front of quarters - 35 Third Street 1872 Amoskeag 600 gpm steam pump and an 1886 hose wagon   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 3- 1872 Amoskeag Steam Engine 600 gpm

Engine 3 Circa 1919

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 3- 1948 GMC/Robinson high pressure fog/hose wagon
photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

1977 Pirsch Foam Pump- 500 gallon booster tank/200 gallon foam pump/1250 gpm

 

Engine Company #3 was organized in 1832 in quarters at 251Cambridge St, near 4th Street. The company at this time was named Niagara 3 and was equipped with a Thayer hand engine. On 18 September 1862, a new Amoskeag 400 gpm horse-drawn steamer was placed in service and a Hunneman horse-drawn hose carriage also was placed in service. Engine 3 became the first horse-drawn company in the city.

On 4 January 1871, the company moved to new quarters at 40 Fourth Street, between Cambridge St. and Gore St. This building also housed Police District  Station #1. On 19 Jan. 1872, a new Amoskeag 600 gpm steam pump was placed in service. On 24 March 1886, a new 4-wheel hose wagon was placed in service by the company.

Engine 3 relocated to new quarters on Third St., near Otis St. on 1 March 1893. On 31 Jan. 1896, the company again moved to new quarters at 35 Third St., at the corner of Gore St. The previous Third St. firehouse was razed for construction of the Middlesex County Court House complex.

In October of 1919, an American LaFrance type 31 tractor was placed under the 1872 steamer and an American LaFrance hose and chemical wagon was placed in service as the wagon. In 1925, a new American LaFrance 750 gpm pump was placed in service by Engine 3.

In July of 1949, a new GMC/Robinson hi-pressure fog/hose wagon was placed in service. In November of the same year, a new Pirsch 1000 gpm pump was delivered and placed in service by the company. A new International/Farrar hose wagon was placed in service in July of 1966. In 1970, the 1949 Pirsch pump was placed out of service. From 1970 until 1977, Engine 3 ran with a series of spare and auxiliary pumps.

On 13 March 1977, a new Pirsch 1250 gpm/foam pump was placed in service. On 18 Sept. 1978, Engine 3 moved to new quarters with Truck 2 at 173 Cambridge Street. On 1 Dec. 1982, Engine 3's hose wagon was reassigned to Engine 9. Engine 3 now became a single unit company. In July of 1998, the current 1998 Pierce Saber foam pump was placed in service.

historical information provided by Ed Morrissey


Engine 4
Apr 13, 2009

The quarters, apparatus, and members of Engine 4 circa 1901

The quarters, apparatus, and members of Engine 4 circa 1901 Note also the fire dog in the photograph. 1901 Abbot and Downing Hose Wagon with an 1869 550 gpm Amoskeag pump  

 photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 4's Abbot & Downing hose wagon circa 1901

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Firefighter with Engine 4's dog - 1901

Firefighter with Engine 4's dog - 1901  

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 4's 1948 Pirsch 1000 gpm pump

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 4's 1966 International/Farrar hose wagon

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

1971 Maxim 500 gallon booster tank/1250 gpm

Engine 4 Hose Wagon (Ex Engine 2)- 1982 International/Saulsbury 500 gallon booster tank/250 gpm

Engine 4's last two-piece company apparatus
1986 International/Saulsbury hose wagon, 250 gpm pump, 500 gallon water tank
(note: the wagon was placed out of service on 27 May 2000)
1995 Pierce Saber pump, 1250 gpm, 500 gallon water tank

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 

In 1846, Hand Engine 4, named "Hydrant 4," was established and was located in a wood building at Western Avenue and River Street. In 1852, the company, now equipped with a Hunneman engine, moved into a brick building at the same location. Due to the steam department and due to lack of manpower in 1866, the company was confined to police district station 2. On 7 March 1871 Hand Engine Company Number 4 was disbanded. It was the last hand engine company in the department.

       Also on 7 March 1871, "Daniel Webster Engine Company #5" was renumbered to Engine 4. The company was located on Russell Street, North Cambridge in a building built and occupied on 28 May 1869. Engine 4 was equipped with an 1869 Hunneman Steamer and a 2 wheel hose wagon with 900' of hose. In January of 1896, Engine 4 received a new Amoskeag 550 gpm steamer. On 20 November of 1896, the company moved to new quarters at 2029 Massachusetts Av., the corner of Blake Street. A Somerville tapper was placed in service in this house and Engine 4 was also assigned to respond to Somerville line boxes.

       On 14 December 1901, a new Abbot and Downing hose wagon was placed in service with 800' of hose. In July of 1917, Engine 4 became motorized when a new American LaFrance 750 gpm, triple combination pump was placed in service. Engine 4 became a single unit company. In 1922, another new American LaFrance 750 gpm triple combination pump was placed in service. The 1917 pump became a spare. On 1 September 1931, a new Mack hose wagon was placed in service, making Engine 4 a two piece company again.

       In June of 1948 a new Pirsch 1000 gpm pump was placed in service. In July of 1948, a new GMC/Robinson hose wagon was placed in service. In July of 1967, a new International/Farrar wagon was placed in service. In January, 1972, a new Maxim 1250 gpm pump was placed in service. On 1 April 1984, a 1982 (former Engine 2) International/Maxim wagon was placed in service. On 12 May 1988, the 1986 (former Engine 2) International/Saulsbury wagon was placed in service. On 27 April 1995, a 1995 Pierce Saber 1250 gpm pump was placed in service. The wagon was placed out of service on 27 May 2000. Engine 4 became a single unit company at that time.

historical information provided by Ed Morrissey


Engine 5
Apr 13, 2009

Engine 5's 1863 steamer -  shown in front of quarters in Inman Square

Engine 5's 1863 steamer - shown in front of quarters in Inman Square  

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Inman Square Fire House - 1874

 The quarters, apparatus, and members of Engine 5 in 1874
(from left to right - the chief's buggy, the steamer, and the hose wagon)

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 5 - 1925 American La France hose wagon - shown in front of quarters in Inman Square

Engine 5 - 1925 American La France hose wagon - shown in front of quarters in Inman Square  

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

1971 Maxim 500 gallon booster tank/1250gpm

E5_oldpump.jpg

1979 Continental/Hendrickson 500 gallon booster tank/1250 gpm

photo from the collection of Fred Ikels

E5_wagon.jpg

Engine 5 Hose Wagon- 1986 International/Saulsbury 500 gallon booster tank/250 gpm

photo from the collection of Fred Ikels

e5tarabithia.jpg  

1991 Pierce Lance Pump (now Engine 11) 500 gallon booster tank/1250 gpm

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 

2007 Pierce Saber 500 gallon booster tank/1250 gpm

 photo courtesy of MassFireTrucks.com

 

The Patrick H. Raymond Engine Company Number 5 was organized on Nov. 30, 1874 in new quarters in Atwood's Corner, now called Inman Square. The company was named in honor of Chief Patrick Raymond, the Chief of the Cambridge Fire Department and also the first Black fire chief in the United States. The company began service with an 1863, 400 gpm, horse drawn steamer and a 2-wheel, horse drawn hose wagon.

  In 1913, the company relocated to temporary quarters at the city stables on Hampshire St., while their own quarters were demolished and rebuilt. In January, 1914, Engine 5 moved into the new quarters on the old site. This was also Fire Headquarters, the city’s first. Prior to this, the Chief’s office was located at city hall. Later, the Fire Alarm Office was moved to floor #3 of this building. (Both Fire Headquarters and Fire Alarm moved to new quarters in 1933). Engine 5 became the first motorized unit in the Department, using a 3-wheel tractor to pull an 1876 steamer and a new Knox motor hose and chemical wagon.

  Engine 5 became single unit in 1918 with the delivery of a new American LaFrance 1000 g.p.m. triple combination pump. The company became double unit again in 1925 following the delivery of a new American LaFrance hose wagon. While responding to a multiple alarm fire in Somerville, on Nov. 10, 1933, Engine 5’s Pump was involved in a serious motor vehicle accident. The pump was totaled and a spare 1917 American LaFrance pump was placed in service. A new Seagrave, 1000 g.p.m. was placed in service on Jan 1, 1935.

   In July, 1948, a new GMC/Robinson hose wagon was placed in service. Engine 5’s Wagon was involved in a serious motor vehicle accident with a rubbish truck on Jan. 7, 1958. The wagon was totaled and a spare was placed in service. A new Ford/Robinson hose wagon was placed in service by the company on March 18, 1958. On Dec. 23, 1962, a 1960, Pirsch, 1000 g.p.m. pump, (formerly Engine 1’s), was placed in service. In July, 1967, a new International/Farrar hose wagon was placed in service.

   On Nov. 28, 1977, Engine 5 relocated to the quarters of Ladder 2, 386 Portland St., while a new floor was installed in their own quarters. The company moved back to 1384 Cambridge St. on Apr. 3, 1978.

    A new Hendrickson/Continental 1250 g.p.m. pump was placed in service on May 4, 1979. On Feb. 5, 1982, a new International/Maxim hose wagon was placed in service. Engine 5 became single unit on June 17, 1985, as the wagon was reassigned to Engine 7. On May 16, 1986, a new International/Saulsbury wagon was placed in service and Engine 9’s 1971 Maxim, 1250 g.p.m. pump was assigned to Engine 5. Engine 5’s Hendrickson pump was reassigned to Engine 9. On Aug. 11, 1989, the original 1979 Hendrickson pump was reassigned to Engine 5. On Aug. 8, 1991, a new Pierce Lance, 1250 g.p.m., four-door- cab pump was placed in service.On 28 April 2000, the wagon was placed out of service. Engine 5 became a single unit company at this time. On 9 December 2007, a new Pierce Sabor 500 gallon tank, 1250 g.p.m. was placed in service.

(Historical information for this narrative was provided by Ed Morrissey)


Engine 6
Apr 13, 2009

Engine 6 is shown in front of quarters at 176 River Street - 1891. The pump was a Manchester Locomotive Works 900 gpm. The hose wagon was an Abbot and Downing.

Engine 6 is shown in front of quarters at 176 River Street - 1891. Pump-Manchester Locomotive Works 900 gpm/Hose wagon-Abbot and Downing  

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 6 - 750 gpm American LaFrance pump - circa 1919

Engine 6 - 750 gpm American LaFrance pump - circa 1919  

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 6 Pump - 1000 gpm Pirsch - delivered in 1962

Engine 6 Pump - 1000 gpm Pirsch - delivered in 1962  

 photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 6's Pump - 1989 Pierce Lance - 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank

Engine 6's Pump - 1989 Pierce Lance - 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank  

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 

  Engine Company #6 was established in 1852 as Pioneer Engine Company #6 and was located in a building on Pioneer Street in Ward 2, Kendall Square. The company ran with a Hunneman hand engine. The firehouse was moved and rebuilt at the corner of Main and Dock Streets. On 2 March 1864, probably due to manpower and equipment shortages caused by the War Between the States, Pioneer Engine Company #6 was disbanded.

         On 11 May 1891, Engine 6 was reorganized at 176 River Street, Cambridgeport  in a new station. (Over 100 years later, this station is still the home of Engine 6.) The apparatus in 1891 included a new, 900 gpm Manchester Locomotive Works steamer and an Abbot and Downing hose wagon.  The company went in service with 12 men assigned.

        In December 0f 1919, Engine 6 became motorized and single-unit with a new, 750 gpm American LaFrance triple combination pump. In 1926, the company again became two-piece as a 1926, American LaFrance type 40 hose wagon was placed in service.

        In 1926, the station was modernized and Chemical Company #1 moved into these quarters. Chemical 1 had relocated from their previous quarters at 5 Western Avenue. Chemical 1 was disbanded in 1928. In 1928, Engine 1 moved into the River Street fire house. Engine 1 ran out of these quarters until 1934 when they moved into the 491 Broadway fire house.

        A new, triple combination, Pirsch 750 gpm pump was placed in service in June of 1944. In 1949, a GMC/Robinson, high-pressure hose wagon was placed in service by the company. On 14 June 1956, a 1948, Pirsch 1000 gpm pump (former Engine 2 and 9) was placed in service. In December of 1962, a new Pirsch 1000 gpm pump was placed in service. In July of 1966, a new International/Farrar hose wagon was placed in service..

      From 25 December 1979 until 25 February 1981, Engine 6 ran with a spare pump. On 25 Feb 1981, the rebuilt Pirsch pump was placed back in service. On 28 March of the same year, a new International/Maxim hose wagon was placed in service.

        On 7 August 1989, Engine 6 placed the current 1989 Pierce Lance 1250 gpm pump in service. The company also became single unit on this date.  From 4 November 1987 until 30 September 1988, Engine 6 was temporarily quartered at headquarters while the house was undergoing major renovations. On 30 September 1988, Engine 6 moved back into the 176 River Street remodeled quarters.

        Engine 6's current pump, the 1250 gpm, Pierce Saber, was placed in service on 21 January 2003. This pump is equipped with a 500 gallon water tank and a 50 gallon foam solution tank. 

(historical information provided by Ed Morrissey)


Engine 7
Apr 13, 2009

Engine 7 circa 1895 - Amoskeag 700 gpm steam pump - Abbot & Downing hose wagon

Engine 7 circa 1895 - Amoskeag 700 gpm steam pump - Abbot & Downing hose wagon   (1/24/2006) - photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 7's Pump - 1944 Pirsch - 750 gpm

Engine 7's Pump - 1944 Pirsch - 750 gpm   (1/24/2006) - photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 7's Wagon - 1949 GMC/Robinson - high pressure fog

Engine 7's Wagon - 1949 GMC/Robinson - high pressure fog   (1/24/2006) - photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 7 in 1993 - 1971 Maxim 1250 gpm pump - 1982 International/Maxim hose wagon

Engine 7 in 1993 - 1971 Maxim 1250 gpm pump - 1982 International/Maxim hose wagon (Ex Engine 5)  

(1/24/2006) - photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine 7 Hose Wagon- 1982 International/Maxim 500 gallon booster tank/2500gpm


Engine 8
Apr 13, 2009

Combination #1 - 1905 (Combination #1 was reestablished as Engine Company #8)

Combination #1 - 1905 (Combination #1 was reestablished as Engine Company #8)   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine #8 Pump - 1919 American LaFrance - 750 gpm

Engine #8 Pump - 1919 American LaFrance - 750 gpm   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine #8 Pump - 1935 Seagrave - 750 gpm

Engine #8 Pump - 1935 Seagrave - 750 gpm  

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine #8 Pump - 1962 Pirsch - 1000 gpm

Engine #8 Pump - 1962 Pirsch - 1000 gpm   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine #8 Pump - (the former Engine #2 Pump) - 1978 Pirsch - 1250 gpm - 300 gallon water tank

Engine #8 Pump - (the former Engine #2 Pump) - 1978 Pirsch - 1250 gpm - 300 gallon water tank   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Engine #8 Hose Wagon- 1979 International/Continental 500 gallon booster tank/250gpm

 

Combination Wagon #1 was established on 5 June 1905 in new quarters (with Truck Company #4) at 113 Garden Street. This  company was the predecessor to Engine 8. The company was temporarily staffed with detail men from Truck 4.

On 1 March 1919, the horse-drawn combination wagon was replaced with a motorized American LaFrance 750 gpm, triple-combination pump.The company was now designated as Engine Company #8. A new American LaFrance hose wagon was placed in service by the company in 1927.

In 1935, a new Seagrave triple-combination 750 gpm pump was placed in service. In 1949, a new GMC/Robinson high-pressure hose wagon was placed in service. In December of 1962, a new Pirsch 1000 gpm pump was assigned to the company. A new International/Farrar hose wagon was assigned to Engine 8 in July of 1967. In 1974, the pump was equipped with 5" hose.

In January of 1979, Engine 8's Pirsch pump was placed out of service. The company ran with a series of spare pumps until September of 1981 when the 1962 Pirsch pump returned to service after extensive rebuilding. The pump now was equipped with a hose-reel to carry the 5" hose. Also in June of 1979, the company was assigned a new hose wagon, a new   International/Continental.

The former hose wagon of Engine 4 (also formerly Engine 2's), a 1982 International/Maxim was assigned to Engine 8 on 12 May 1988. The 1979 hose wagon was scrapped. On 6 August 1989, a 1978 Pirsch 1250 gpm pump (former Engine 2) was assigned to Engine 8. On 15 August 1996, Engine 8 became a single-unit company as the 1982 hose wagon was scrapped.

Engine 8's current apparatus, the 1999 Pierce Saber, was placed in service on 26 November 1999.

historical information provided by Ed Morrissey

 


Engine 9
Apr 16, 2009

1977 Continental 1250/500 gpm

1989 Pierce Lance 1250/500 gpm

 

In the year 1861, a privately owned company was organized by the Boston and Maine Railroad and was located in the Prison Point Yards. This company was designated as Washington #9 and was available to the city upon request. Washington #9 was disbanded in 1866.

On June 7, 1894, Chemical Company #2 was organized in new quarters at 167 Lexington Avenue using a Babcock Chemical Engine with 2 - 60 gallon chemical tanks. In 1916, the company was assigned a new Knox combination Hose and Chemical wagon. The company now was designated as Combination #2.

On October 2, 1928, the company was assigned a new American LaFrance 1000 gpm, triple combination pump. The company was now designated as Engine Company #9.

In 1951, a 1948 Pirsch 1000 gpm pump (formerly Engine 2's) was assigned to the company. On Feb. 1, 1952, a new GMC/Robinson hose wagon was placed in service by Engine 9, making the company double unit. This also made all engine companies in the city two-piece companies.

The pump was involved in an accident on Sept. 24, 1955. Auxiliary pump Engine 11 was now in use by Engine 9. On May 15, 1956, a 1944 Pirsch 750 gpm (former Engine 6) was placed in service as the pump. On July 14, 1967 a new International/Farrar hose wagon was assigned to the company, replacing the 1952 GMC.

A new Maxim, 1250 gpm/300 gallon water tank pump was placed in service on Nov. 3, 1971. Following a succession of spare hose wagons in use by the company, Engine 9 became single unit again in September, 1984.

On May 16, 1986, Engine 9 and Engine 5 swapped pumps. Engine 9 now ran with the 1979 Hendrickson/Continental 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank pump.

On August 11, 1989, a new 1989 Pierce Lance 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank apparatus was placed in service. This pump was in service until  the spring of 2004, when it was traded in on the newly ordered pump. Engine 9 ran with spare pump Engine 10 (the former Engine 6 pump) until the new pump was delivered and placed in service. 

On August 20, 2004, the current 2004 Pierce Saber 1250 gpm/500 gallon water tank apparatus was paced in service.

- historical information for this narrative was provided by Ed Morrissey


Ladder 1
Apr 13, 2009

 

 Ladder Company 1 - 1890 Abbot and Downing ladder carriage (shown in front of quarters in Brattle Square)

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey 

Ladder 1 -1918 American LaFrance 75' aerial ladder
photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Ladder 1 - 1946 Pirsch 100' aerial ladder (shown in front of quarters - 491 Broadway)
photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Aerial Tower 1- 1971 Sutphen 85' aerial tower
photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Aerial Tower 1- 1986 Sutphen 100' Aerial Tower 

HISTORY:

Ladder Company #1 was organized in 1846 in the quarters of Engine 2 on Main St, near Windsor. The Company, using a hand drawn ladder carriage, was named "Franklin Hook and Ladder 1." Engine 2, sharing the same quarters, at that time was known as "Union Engine Company 2." In 1864, Ladder 1 was modernized with the purchase of horses.

On October 1, 1874, the Company was relocated to the new city building at 5 Western Av., Central Square. Here, Hook & Ladder 1 shared quarters with the newly organized "Supply Hose Company #1." Ladder 1 moved to the new city building at 108 Mount Auburn St., Brattle Square, on July 1, 1880.

In 1890, the Company received a new Abbot and Downing ladder carriage. In 1918, a new American LaFrance motorized truck, with a 75’ aerial ladder, was placed in service.

 PRESENT LOCATION:

On Feb. 25, 1934, Ladder 1 moved to its present quarters at 491 Broadway. On March 1, 1935, a new Pirsch tractor trailer with an 85’ aerial was placed in service. This aerial ladder truck was all hydraulically-mechanically operated, one of the first of its kind in North America. The Company ran with this piece of apparatus until 1946, when a new, 1946 tractor trailer with 100’ aerial was placed in service. In 1965, a new 1965 International/Cincinnati Cab tractor was placed under the 1946 trailer. Two years later, a new 1967 International/Cincinnati Cab tractor was placed under the 1946 trailer. (The 1965 tractor was mated with Ladder 2’s 1942 trailer and became spare Ladder 5).

Tragically, on Aug 27, 1968, while en route to a fire, Ladder 1 was involved in a traffic accident with a tractor trailer truck at the intersection Cambridge Street and Prospect Street. One member received fatal injuries and another was severely injured. The apparatus was destroyed. The 1965 tractor/1942 trailer was reassigned to the Company.

On Feb. 18, 1972, an 85’ Sutphen aerial tower was placed in service. The Company designation became "Aerial Tower 1." The Company ran with this apparatus for 14 years. On June 25, 1986, a new, 90’ Sutphen aerial tower was placed in service.

August 29, 1991, "Ladder Company 1" was back in service with a 1976 Seagrave 100’ tractor trailer, 4-door, fully enclosed cab. (This was the former apparatus of Boston Ladder 7). The Sutphen tower was reassigned to Ladder 2.

 TODAY:

Ladder Company #1’s present apparatus was placed in service on June 28, 1992. This piece is a Pierce Arrow 105’ rearmount, 4-door, fully enclosed cab. The Company shares quarters at 491 Broadway with Engine 1, Rescue 1, Rescue 2, the Hazardous Materials/Special Operations Command Unit, and the Air Supply Unit. The members of Ladder 1 are trained in and are part of the Cambridge Fire Department Hazardous Materials Task Force.

Currently, there are 16 members on the roster of Ladder Company #1. This includes the captain, 3 lieutenants, and 12 firefighters. 
         -- historical information was provided by Ed Morrissey


Ladder 2
Apr 13, 2009

Ladder Company #2 - circa 1902 - Abbot and Downing Ladder Carriage (in front of quarters at 386 Portland Street)   

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 

The 386 Portland St. quarters of Ladder 2 (built 1886, since demolished)

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey 

Ladder 2- 1963 Pirsch 100'

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey 

1975 Seagrave (ex Boston L-7) 100' Tractor drawn Tiller (borrowed from The Boston Fire Department for about 8 years)  

1982 International cab/1963 Pirsch 100' TDA

1986 Sutphen 100' Aerial Tower Ladder
photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey 

Ladder Company #2 was organized in 1873 in a wooden building at Cambridge and Portland Streets but at this time, no men were assigned to the company. In 1874, Ladder 2 was placed in full service. The company was equipped with a ladder carriage built by E.B. Leverich of New York and was built in the New York City pattern. Ladder 2 at this time was named Bradford Ladder Company #2. In 1882, the company was equipped with a 65' Bangor pole ladder.

In July of 1886, the company's quarters was condemned and construction was begun on new quarters. Ladder 2 moved in to the new fire house  at 386 Portland Street in 1887. On 18 March 1902, a new Abbot and Downing ladder carriage was placed in service. This rig carried two 30 gallon chemical tanks. In December of 1921, a new American LaFrance 75' tractor-trailer ladder truck was placed in service. With this new truck, Ladder 2 became motorized. Ladder 2 was the last company in the city to become motorized.

In January, 1942 a new Pirsch 100' tractor-trailer aerial ladder truck was placed in service by the company. On 19 January 1963, another new 100' tractor-trailer ladder truck was placed in service.

On 19 Sept. 1978, Ladder Company #2 moved into new quarters with Engine 3 at 173 Cambridge Street. (The Portland Street firehouse burned in a two alarm fire on 22 October 1978, Box 2-2161).

The company received a rebuilt 1959 Pirsch 100' tractor-trailer on 25 Aug. 1982. This truck had been rebuilt by Continental Fire Trucks, Inc. of Hopkinton, MA. On 29 Aug. 1989, the company placed in service a 1976 Seagrave 100' tractor trailer, the former apparatus of Boston Ladder 7. On 15 Oct. 1991, Truck 2 placed the the 1986 100'  Sutphen aerial tower in service.  This truck had been formerly assigned to Truck 1.

In April, 2002, the current apparatus was placed in service, the 2002 Pierce mid-mount, heavy duty, 95' Tower Ladder. 

historical information provided by Ed Morrissey 


Ladder 3
Apr 13, 2009

Truck 3- in front of quarters circa 1894 American LaFrance - Hayes 75' Aerial Ladder  

 photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Truck 3 - 1938 Pirsch 100' Aerial Ladder

 photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

1989 Maxim 100' TDA (Delivery photo)

 

Ladder Company #3 was organized on 2 April 1894 in a new house on Front Street opposite Main Street. (Front Street was later renamed Massachusetts Avenue.) Ladder 3 shared these quarters with Engine 2. The company ran with a new American LaFrance, horse-drawn, 75 foot Hayes aerial ladder truck.

In 1919 the former apparatus of Ladder 1, an 1890 ordinary ladder truck, was given to Ladder 3. The company was motorized in November of 1921 when a new American LaFrance, tractor-trailer, 85 foot aerial ladder was placed in service by the company. On 17 October 1935, Ladder 3 was involved  a collision with Engine 2. As a result of this collision, the aerial was broken. The aerial was replaced with the 75 foot stick, formerly Ladder 1's. In October of 1938, a new 100 foot Pirsch, tractor-trailer was placed in service.

On 19 January 1963, the company placed in service a  Pirsch tractor-trailer truck with a 100 foot aerial. On the 1st of July 1981, the 1963 truck was placed out of service. Truck 3 ran with various spare trucks until the 15th of June 1983 when a rebuilt truck was placed in service. The rebuilt truck consisted of Ladder 3's former tractor with Ladder 2's former trailer. The truck had been rebuilt by Continental Fire Apparatus.

Truck Company 3 placed a new Maxim 100 foot aerial tractor trailer truck in service on 5 April 1989. On the 7th of July 1994, a new Pierce Arrow rearmount 105 foot aerial ladder truck was placed in service by the company. The 1989 Maxim was reassigned to Truck 4.

historical information provided by Ed Morrissey

 


Ladder 4
Apr 13, 2009

Ladder #4 - 1905

Ladder #4 - 1905  

from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Ladder #4 - 1935 Pirsch - 85' stick

Ladder #4 - 1935 Pirsch - 85' stick   

from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Ladder #4 - 1980 Pirsch - 100' stick

Ladder #4 - 1980 Pirsch - 100' tractor-trailer tiller 

from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Truck #4 1989 Maxim - 100' tractor-trailer (the former apparatus of Truck #3)

Ladder #4- 1989 Maxim - 100' tractor-trailer tiller (formerly Ladder #3) 

from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 

Ladder Company #4 was organized on 15 June 1905 in a new house at 113 Garden Street (the corner of Garden and Sherman Streets) using a horse-drawn ladder carriage. In July of 1920, the company received a new American LaFrance motorized city-service truck. In 1924, a new American LaFrance 75' tractor-trailer truck was placed in service. In February of 1946, Ladder 4 placed in service a 1935 Pirsch 85' wooden stick aerial ladder truck (formerly Ladder 1's apparatus).

In January, 1959, a new Pirsch 100' metal aerial truck was placed in service by the company. On 24 October 1980, a new 100' Pirsch truck was placed in service. This 1980 Pirsch was removed from service on 14 December 1992. A spare 1976 Seagrave 100' tractor-trailer was in service until July of 1994.

On 7 July 1994, the 1989 Maxim 100' tractor-trailer (former Truck 3's apparatus) was assigned to Truck Company #4.

In March of 2002, Ladder 4's current apparatus was placed in service, the 2002 Pierce rear-mount, heavy-duty 105' aerial ladder. 

historical information provided by Ed Morrissey

 


Ladder 5
Mar 20, 2009

1989 Maxim 100' Tiller (Spare Apparatus)

now Chelsea Ladder 3 (12/09)

 

Apparatus photos courtesy of Doug Boudrow, Massfiretrucks.com, and John Parise


M2
May 14, 2009

 

1991 Ford Crown Victoria Wagon

Photo Courtesy of Matt McDonald

 


Rescue
Apr 16, 2009

Rescue 1 - 1932 Ford

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

 Rescue 1 - 1943 International Fog Unit (former United States Navy)

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Rescue 1 - 1949 GMC/Lacey

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey

Rescue 1 - 1969 Mack/Gerstenslager

photo from the collection of Ed Morrissey


1989 Ford Saulsbury

 

Rescue 2- 1976 Chevy

Rescue 1 was organized on 25 March 1932 and was located in the quarters of Engine 4 at 2029 Massachusetts Avenue. The Rescue was established as a result of the death of Fire Lieutenant William J.  Atkinson of Engine 4. Lt. Atkinson died while attempting to rescue 2 men who had been overcome in grease-pit manhole. Lt. Atkinson and both civilian victims died in the incident. The lieutenant had been wearing an "all-service" type canister filter mask. (The all-service mask filtered contaminants in the atmosphere but did not provide a supply of air or oxygen.) The purpose of the rescue company was to provide a fire company for specialized rescue incidents and to provide a mechanism to "rescue the rescuers" when necessary.  

          Chief of Department Herman Gutheim, with the support of city officials, organized this new fire company in spite of the economic depression in the country at the time. Fire Captains Arthur Marshall and George Friel were assigned to train the company. Captain Friel went to New York City, riding and working with the Fire Department of New York City's Rescue 1 to learn about heavy and special rescue procedures. While riding with Rescue 1, Capt. Friel was involved in a rescue of persons from a fire. Capt. Friel received an FDNY medal for this incident.   After a period of training, Rescue 1 began service in August of 1932.

          In 1933, the Rescue was involved in a serious accident destroying the apparatus. The company ran with a spare wagon. On 25 February 1934, Rescue 1 relocated to the new Fire Headquarters building at 491 Broadway. This is the current home of the Rescue Company. In October of 1935, the company placed a new Seagrave rescue wagon in service. In 1947, a 1943 International high-pressure fog wagon (former U.S. Navy) was placed in service. The Rescue became a two-piece company.

          In January of 1949, a new GMC/Lacey rescue apparatus was placed in service by the company. Rescue 1 began transporting victims. The company placed a new Ford rescue in service in August, 1960. Also in 1960, the fog wagon was reassigned to Engine 1.

          A new Mack CF/Gerstenslager rescue was placed in service in October, 1969. In March, 1979, a Chevrolet/kurbmaster/Wolf Coach rescue was placed in service. The Cambridge Fire Department Hazardous Materials Task Force was organized under the Rescue Company in 1986. The Mack apparatus was refurbished for use as the HazMat vehicle.

          In October of 1989, a new Ford/Saulsbury rescue was placed in service. On 23 May 1994, a new Ford/3-D HazMat rescue apparatus was placed in service. In 1995, the Department disposed of the 1989 Ford/Saulsbury rig. Engine 4's wagon was reconfigured and was operated as the HazMat vehicle temporarily.

          On 16 May 1996, Rescue 1 placed in service a new Emergency One/Freightliner apparatus.

          On 29 September 2003, a new Spartan/Road Rescue apparatus was placed in  service as Rescue 1. The former Rescue 1, the E-One/Freightliner will be rebuilt and run as Rescue 3, a spare and special-event rescue. 

          Effective 1 May 2005, paramedic service was initiated in the City of Cambridge Fire Department. Rescue Company #1, as well as Squads #2 and #4 are Paramedic Response Units. 

Historical information was provided by Ed Morrissey




Page Last Updated: May 28, 2009 (06:58:00)
 
 
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